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Bibliography
The following bibliography is comprised of published nonfiction sources which provide information on women in Arizona history. Many items can be found at public libraries, but some are only available in research libraries located at state universities, archives, or historical societies. This bibliography is meant to provide students, educators, amateur historians, and scholars with a starting point for research. Be aware that while this list is comprehensive it is not conclusive, and new material becomes available all the time.

If you are seeking primary source material (original documents), there is a guide at the end of the bibliography which will help you navigate the abundant and rich resources of Arizona’s repositories.

Biography Collections:

Arizona Federation of Business and Professional Women. Women Who Made a Difference, 3 vols. Tucson: Arizona Business and Professional Women’s Foundation, 1994. Biographical information about female members of this organization and activities of specific clubs.

Banks, Leo W. Stalwart Women: Frontier Stories of Indomitable Spirit. Phoenix: Arizona Highways, 1999.

Brown, Wynne. More than Petticoats: Remarkable Arizona Women. Guilford, CT: Globe Pequot Press, 2003.

Daughters of the Gila County Pioneers. A Cultural History of the Pioneer Women of Gila County, Arizona and their Descendants. Payson: Git a Rope! Publishing, 2002.

Johnson, Dee Strickland. Arizona Women: Weird, Wild, and Wonderful. Phoenix: Cowboy Miner Productions, 2006.

Johnson, James W. The Noble and Notorious: Arizona Politicians. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2002. Includes profiles of Lorna Lockwood, Rose Mofford, and Sandra Day O’Connor.

Leavengood, Betty. Grand Canyon Women: Lives Shaped by Landscape. Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon Association, 2004.

Marriott, Barbara. In Our Own Words: The Lives of Arizona Pioneer Women. Tucson: Fireship Press, 2009.

Martin, Patricia Preciado. Songs My Mother Sang to Me: An Oral History of Mexican American Women. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1992.

Matsumoto, Valerie J. Shikata ga nai: Japanese American Women in Central Arizona, 1910-1978. Honors thesis, Arizona State University, 1978.

McClintock, James H. Arizona: Prehistoric, Aboriginal, Pioneer, Modern. 3 vols. Chicago: S. J. Clarke, 1916. Biographical material on numerous early Anglo Arizona women.

Morgan, Anne Hodges and Rennard Strickland, eds. Arizona Memories. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1984.

Tod, Diane, and Crowe, Rosalie, eds. Arizona Women’s Hall of Fame. Phoenix: Arizona Historical Society, 1985-1991.

Biographies of Women Pioneers (ranching and mining):

Akire, Frank T. “The Little Lady of the Triangle Bar.” Journal of Arizona History 15 (1974):107-118. A city girl adjusts to ranch life outside of Phoenix.

Berry, Michelle K. “’Be Sure to Fix the Fence’: The Arizona Cowbelles’ Public Persona, 1950-1960.” Frontiers (2004): 151-175.

Bourne, Eulalia. Woman in Levi’s. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1967.

Claridge, Junietta. “We Tried to Stay Refined: Pioneering in the Mineral Strip.” Journal of Arizona History 16 (1975): 405-426.

Cunningham, Bob. “Woolsey’s Wife: The Arizona Adventures of Mary H. Taylor.” Journal of Arizona History 28 (1987): 17-30.

Curnow, Alice. The Journey with Tom: Memories of an Arizona Pioneer Woman, 1861-1940. Edited by Mona Lange McCroskey. Prescott: HollyBear Press, 2003.

Doan, May Cargill. “I Wouldn’t Trade These Yesterdays: The Reminiscence of May Cargill Doan.” Journal of Arizona History 6 (1965): 116-131 and 188-203. Two-part article on life in early Yuma, Tucson, and Phoenix.

Faunce, Hilda. Desert Wife. Boston: Little, Brown, 1934.

Finley, Dorothy H. Just Plain Dorothy: The Life of Dorothy Hunt Finley, Cowgirl, Teacher, Tycoon, Philanthropist. Tucson: Holbrook Street Press, 2009.

Fischer, Ron W. Nellie Cashman: Frontier Angel. Honolulu: Talei Publishing, 2000.

Hoecker, Pamela Hoagland. “Mary Kidder Rak: Ranch Wife.” Arizonia 3 (1962): 40-43. Ranch life in the remote Chiricahua Mountains.

Jeffers, Jo. Ranch Wife. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1993.

Ledbetter, Susan. Nellie Cashman: Prospector and Trailblazer. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1993.

Linley, Margaret. Borderline Lady. Santa Barbara: M. Linley, 1995.

Lowell, Susan and Diane Boyer, eds. “Trading Post Honeymoon: The 1895 Diary of Emma Walmisley Sykes.” Journal of Arizona History 30 (1989): 417-444.

Martin, Patricia Preciado and JosÄ Galvez, eds. Beloved Land: An Oral History of Mexican Americans in Southern Arizona. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004.

Maxwell, Margaret F. “Cordelia Adams Crawford of the Tonto Basin.” Journal of Arizona History 26 (1985): 415-428.

-----. “Ida Genug of Peeples Valley: A Woman of the West.” Journal of Arizona History 25 (1984): 331-348.

McCroskey, Mona Lange. “Grace Marion Sparkes: Matriarch of the Early Arizona Tourist Industry.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1987.

Mifflin, Margot. The Blue Tattoo: The Life of Olive Oatman. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2009.

O’Connor, Sandra Day and H. Alan Day. Lazy B: Growing Up on a Cattle Ranch in the American Southwest. New York: Random House, 2002.

Rak, Mary Kidder. A Cowman’s Wife. Austin: Texas State Historical Association, 1993.

Rogers, W. Lane. “From Colonia Dublan to Binghampton: The Mormon Odyssey of Frederick, Nancy, and Amanda Williams.” Journal of Arizona History 35 (1994): 19-46.

Root, Sophie Whipple. “Red Head: Her Story.” Arizonia 2 (1961):23-28. An account of a girl growing up in Tucson, 1868-1875.

Spence, Mary Lee, ed. The Arizona Diary of Lily Frémont, 1878-1881. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1997.

-------. “’A Lonesome Homesick Day’: Lily Frémont’s View of Arizona Territory, 1878-1881.” Journal of Arizona History 38 (1997): 213-232.

-------. “Jessie Benton Frémont: First Lady of Arizona.” Journal of Arizona History 24 (1983): 55-72.

Tessman, Norm. “The Personal Journals and Arizona Letters of Margaret Hunt McCormick.” Journal of Arizona History 26 (1985): 41-52.

Waterhouse, Eugenia Scott, ed. “Westward Ho! With a Mining Engineer: Alice Gomersall Scott’s Recollections of Life in Miami, Arizona, and Mogollon, New Mexico, 1912-1922.” Journal of Arizona History 39(1998): 175-190.

Wilbur-Cruce, Eva Antonia. A Beautiful, Cruel Country. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1987.

Women at Work (see also specific professions below):

Fischer, Christiane. “A Profile of Women in Arizona in Frontier Days.” Journal of the West (1977): 42-53.

Kingsolver, Barbara. Holding the Line: Women in the Great Arizona Mine Strike of 1983. New York: ILR Press, 1996.

Mattingly, Doreen J. and Ellen R. Hansen, eds. Women and Change at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Mobility, Labor, and Activism. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2006.

Melcher, Mary. “Tending Children, Chickens, and Cattle: Southern Arizona Ranch and Farm Women, 1910-1940.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1994.

Poling-Kempes, Lesley. The Harvey Girls: Women Who Opened the West. New York: Marlowe & Co., 1991.

Women Writers and Journalists:

Brown, Clara Spalding. Tombstone from a Woman’s Point of View: The Correspondence of Clara Spalding Brown, July 7, 1880 to November 14, 1882. Edited by Lynn R. Bailey. Tucson: Westernlore Press, 1998.

Joy, Betty E. Hammer. Angela Hutchinson Hammer: Arizona’s Pioneer Newspaper Woman. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2005.

Maxwell, Margaret F. A Passion for Freedom: The Life of Sharlot Hall. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1982.

Wagner-Martin, Linda. Barbara Kingsolver. Philadelphia: Chelsea House Publishers, 2004.

Women in Politics, Law, and Government:

Berman, David R. “Gender and Issue Voting after Suffrage Expansion in Arizona.” Social Science Quarterly 74 (1993): 838-850.

---------. “Male Support for Woman Suffrage: An Analysis of Voting Patterns in the Mountain West.” Social Science History 11(1987): 281-294.

---------. Reformers, Corporations, and the Electorate: An Analysis of Arizona’s Age of Reform. Niwot: University Press of Colorado, 1992.

Clark, Nancy Tisdale. “The Demise of Demon Rum in Arizona.” Journal of Arizona History 18 (1977): 69-92.

De Haan, Amy. “Arizona Women Argue for the Vote: The 1912 Initiative Campaign for Women’s Suffrage.” Journal of Arizona History (2004): 375-394.

-------. “Unfinished Citizenship: Legal, Political, and Economic Limitations on Women’s Citizenship in Early Twentieth-Century Arizona.” MA thesis, Northern Arizona University, 2006.

Foster, Anne L. “The Right Kind of Girl: Pauline M. O’Neill.” In Rough Writings: Perspectives on Buckey O’Neill, Pauline M. O’Neill, and Roosevelt’s Rough Riders. Compiled by Janet Lovelady. Prescott: Sharlot Hall Museum Press, 1998.

Janitch, Danielle. “Sarah Herring Sorin: Arizona’s First Woman Attorney.” Stanford: Stanford University Law School Women’s Legal History Biography Project, 2001.

Johnson, James W. The Noble and Notorious: Arizona Politicians. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2002. Includes profiles of Lorna Lockwood, Rose Mofford, and Sandra Day O’Connor.

Jones, Kay F. “Ana Frohmiller: Watchdog of the Arizona Treasury.” Journal of Arizona History 25 (1984): 349-368.

Kasper, Jacquelyn Gayle. “Sarah Herring Sorin, Arizona’s First Woman Lawyer.” Western Legal History (1999): 211-240.

Kelly, Rita Mae, ed. Women and the Arizona Political Process: Arizona Women’s Town Hall. Maryland: University Press of America, 1988.

Kyte, Elinor C. “A Tough Job for a Gentle Lady.” Journal of Arizona History 25 (1984): 385-398. Biography of school superintendent Bessie Kidd Best of Coconino County.

Lauerman, Thomas. “De-Sexing the Ballot Box: The History of Woman Suffrage in Arizona, 1883-1912.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1973.

LoVecchio, Janolyn. “’Give Us the Chance to Go All the Way’: The Struggle of Arizona Women to Sit on Juries, 1921-1945.” Journal of Arizona History 43 (2002): 343-368.

-------. “Jessie Bevan: From the Boarding House to the State House,” Cochise County Historical Journal, 38 Fall/Winter (2008): 7-23.

Lykes, Aimee De Potter. “Phoenix Women in the Development of Public Policy: Territorial Beginnings.” In Phoenix in the Twentieth Century: Essays in Community History. Edited by G. Wesley Johnson, Jr. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993.

McFeatters, Ann Carey. Sandra Day O’Connor: Justice in the Balance. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 2005.

Miller, Kristie. “A Volume of Friendship: The Correspondence of Isabella Greenway and Eleanor Roosevelt, 1904-1953.” Journal of Arizona History 40 (1999): 121-156.

---------. “’I Have Been Waiting for it All My Life’: The Congressional Career of Isabella Greenway.” Journal of Arizona History 45 (2004): 121-142.

---------. Isabella Greenway: An Enterprising Woman. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004.

-------- and Robert H. McGinnis, eds. A Volume of Friendship: The Letters of Eleanor Roosevelt and Isabella Greenway, 1904-1953. Tucson: The Arizona Historical Society, 2010.

Morrison, Betty. “Isabella Greenway: Arizona’s First Congresswoman.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1977.

Osselaer, Heidi J. “Arizona Political Women.” In Encyclopedia of Women in the American West. Edited by Gordon Bakken and Brenda Farrington. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2003.

-------.“Nellie Trent Bush: Arizona Politician and Lady Maverick.” In Territorial Times (Fall 2008), Prescott Corral of Westerners/Sharlot Hall Museum.

--------.“’We Are Here for Business’: Arizona’s Women Legislators, 1914 to 1940.” Journal of the West 3 (2003): 17-24.

---------. Winning Their Place: Arizona Women in Politics, 1883-1950, Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2009.

---------. “’A Woman for a Woman’s Job’: Arizona Women in Politics, 1900-1950.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 2000.

Palmer, Carol S. “Challenging Tradition: Arizona Women Fight for the Equal Rights Amendment.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 2007.

Reingold, Beth. Representing Women: Sex, Gender and Legislative Behavior in Arizona and California. Chapel Hill: University of North Carolina Press, 2000.

Robinson, Geroid. “Arizona’s Mothers of Law.” Overland Monthly (1916): 3-6. Article on Arizona’s first female legislators, Rachel Berry and Frances Willard Munds.

Saint-Germain, Michelle A. “Does Their Difference Make a Difference? The Impact of Women on Public Policy in the Arizona Legislature.” Social Science Quarterly 70 (1989): 956-968.

Sargent, Claire King. Journey Proud: Recollections of a Fifties Woman. Phoenix: Oak Tree Press, 1999.

Snapp, Meredith A. “Defeat the Democrats: The Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage in Arizona, 1914 and 1916.” Journal of the West (1975): 131-139.

-------. “Defeat the Democrats: The Arizona Campaigns of the Congressional Union for Woman Suffrage.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1976.

VanderMeer, Philip. “Lorna C. Lockwood.” In Encyclopedia of Women in the American West. Edited by Gordon M. Bakken and Brenda Farrington. Thousand Oaks, CA: Sage Publications, 2003.

Ware, Harry David. “Alcohol, Temperance and Prohibition in Arizona.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1995.

Williams, Mattie L. “Woman Suffrage in Arizona.” Arizona Historical Review (1929): 69-73.

Women and Education:

Bourne, Eulalia. Nine Months is a Year at Baboquivari School. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1968.

--------. Ranch Schoolteacher. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1974.

Carson, Karen Vanae. “Black Phoenician Women as Educators during the Era of Jim Crow, 1896-1954.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 2000.

Goldsmith, Raquel Rubio. “Shipwrecked in the Desert: A Short History of the Mexican Sisters of the House of the Providence in Douglas, Arizona, 1927-1949.” In╩Women on the U.S.-Mexico Border. Edited by Vicky L. Ruiz and Susan Tiano. Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1987, pp. 177-195.

Haggerson, Nelson L. Oh Yes I Can! A Biography of Arlena E. Seneca. Tempe, AZ: Nornel Associates, 1994.

Hronek, Pamela Claire. “Women and Normal Schools: Tempe Normal, a Case Study, 1885-1925.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1985.

Kyte, Elinor C. “A Tough Job for a Gentle Lady.” Journal of Arizona History 25 (1984): 385-398. Biography of school superintendent Bessie Kidd Best of Coconino County.

McNeil, Teresa. “Sisters of St. Joseph’s Under Fire: Pioneer Convent School on the Colorado River.” Journal of Arizona History 29 (1988): 35-50.

Riffe, Terri Dean. “A History of Women’s Sports at the University of Arizona.” PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, 1986.

Thul, Jackie Lynn Byrd. "African American School Segregation in Arizona from 1863-1954.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1993..

Underhill, Karen J. “I Remember: Depression-Era Students at Arizona State Teachers College.” Journal of Arizona History 37 (1996): 163-180.

Van Metre, Patricia Downer. In Her Own Words: George Garner Harvill. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1991. Work of a Tucson woman who created the University of Arizona’s first foreign exchange program.

Women in the Arts and Architecture:

Cook, William. “Mrs. Fiske Tours Arizona.” Journal of Arizona History 22 (1981): 277-294.Well-known actress tours the state.

Grattan, Virginia L. Mary Colter: Builder upon the Red Earth. Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon Association, 1992.

Jorgenson, Avis E., ed. “Summer of Innocence: The Desert Rovers All-Girl Orchestra Barnstorms Arizona, 1930: The Recollections of Ardis Larsen Clark.” Journal of Arizona History 44 (2003): 265-310.

Loescher, Tricia. “Kate Thomson Cory: Artist in Hopiland.” Journal of Arizona History 43 (2002):1-40.

Mangum, Richard K. and Sherry G. Mangum. One Woman’s West: The Life of Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton. Flagstaff: Northland Publishing, 1997.

Norwood, Vera and Janice Monk. The Desert Is No Lady: Southwestern Landscapes in Women's Writing and Art. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1997.

Nucci, Sarah Louise. “Kate Thomson Cory: An Independent Victorian Woman in Arizona.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 2001.

Women in Science, Health, and Medicine:

Franklin, Kathy Smith. “’A Spirit of Mercy’: The Sisters of Mercy and the Founding of St. Joseph’s Hospital in Phoenix, 1892-1912.” Journal of Arizona History 39 (1998): 263-288.

-----. “’A Spirit of Mercy’: The Founding of Saint Joseph’s Hospital, 1892-1912.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1997.

Kay, Margarita Artschwager. “Health and Illness in the Barrio: Women’s Point of View.” PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, 1972.

Melcher, Mary. “Judge Thomas Tang and Dr. Pearl Tang: Path Breakers in Law and Medicine.” Journal of the West 44 (2005): 70-77.

-------. “Times of Crisis and Joy: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering in Rural Arizona, 1910-1940.” Journal of Arizona History 40 (1999):181-200.

Ross, Amy Elisa. “Every Home a Laboratory: Arizona Farm Women, the Extension Service, and Rural Modernization, 1932-1952.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1998.

Stringer-Bowsher, Sarah. “Not So Plain Jane: An Exploration of a Professional Arizona Woman, Jane Herbst Rider (1889-1981).” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 2007.

Trennert, Robert A. “Sage Memorial Hospital and the Nation’s First All-Indian School of Nursing.” Journal of Arizona History 44 (2003): 353-374.

--------.“Superwomen in Indian Country: U.S.I.S. Field Nurses in Arizona and New Mexico, 1928-1940.” Journal of Arizona History 41 (2000): 31-56.

Webb, George E. “A Woman’s Place is in the Lab: Arizona’s Women Research Scientists, 1910-1950.” Journal of Arizona History 34 (1993): 45-64.

Women and Domestic Life:

Arrington, Leonard. “The Economic Role of Pioneer Mormon Women.” Western Humanities Review. 9 (1995): 145-164.

Benton-Cohen, Katherine. “Common Purpose, Worlds Apart: Mexican-American, Mormon, and Midwestern Women Homesteaders in Cochise County, Arizona.” Western Historical Quarterly (2005): 429-451.

Campbell, Julie A. “Madres y Esposas: Tucson’s Spanish-American Mothers and Wives Association.” Journal of Arizona History 31 (1990): 161-182.

Dankowski, Becky. “Women in Phoenix, 1870-1940: Daily Life and Intercultural Relations.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1997.

Ellis, Catherine H. “That Ought to Give Hitler╔A Nice Big Headache”: Pearl Hunt’s Letters from the Home Front, Navajo County, 1939-1945.” Journal of Arizona History 48 (2007): 1-30.

Guy, Donna. “The Economics of Widowhood in Arizona, 1880-1940.” In On Their Own: Widows and Widowhood in the American Southwest, 1848-1939. Edited by Arlene Scadron. Urbana: University of Illinois Press, 1988.

Hardaway, Roger D. “Unlawful Love: A History of Arizona’s Miscegenation Law.” Journal of Arizona History (1986): 377-390.

Hietter, Paul T. “To Encourage the Preservation and Sanctity of the Marriage Relation: Victorian Attitudes in Arizona Territory and the Murder Prosecution of Frank C. Kibbey.” Journal of Arizona History 42 (2001): 249-276.

Johnson, Susan L. “Sharing Bed and Board: Cohabitation and Cultural Difference in Central Arizona Mining Towns.” Frontiers 7 (1984): 36-42.

-------. Women in Central Arizona Mining and Supply Settlements, 1863-1873. Tucson: Southwest Institute for Research on Women, 1982.

-------. “Women’s Households and Relationships in the Mining West: Central Arizona, 1863-1873.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1984.

Lowell, Julia C. “Women and Men in Warfare and Migration: Implications of Gender Imbalance in the Grasshopper Region of Arizona.” American Antiquity (2007): 95-123.

Melcher, Mary. “Times of Crisis and Joy: Pregnancy, Childbirth and Mothering in Rural Arizona, 1910-1940.” Journal of Arizona History 40 (1999):181-200.

--------. “Tending Children, Chickens, and Cattle: Southern Arizona Ranch and Farm Women, 1910-1940.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1994.

Melton, Brad and Dean Smith, eds. Arizona Goes to War: The Home Front and the Front Lines during World War II. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2003. Chapter on women on the home front.

O’Neill, Colleen. “Domesticity Deployed: Gender, Race, and the Construction of Class Struggle in the Bisbee Deportation.” Labor History (1993): 256-273.

Phillips, James Cleith. “’As Sisters in Zion’: Mormon Women and the United Order in Arizona’s Little Colorado Colonies.” Journal of Arizona History 51 (2010): 155-172.

Ross, Amy Elisa. “Every Home a Laboratory: Arizona Farm Women, the Extension Service, and Rural Modernization, 1932-1952.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1998.

Roth, Barbara J. Engendering Households in the Prehistoric Southwest. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2010.

Rothschild, Mary Logan, and Hronek, Pamela Claire. Doing What the Day Brought: An Oral History of Arizona Women. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1992.

Stone, Laura Lynn. “Captive, Cohabitant, Community Builder: Arizona Women, 1865-1935.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1991.

Summerhayes, Martha. Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army Life of a New England Woman. Salem, Mass.: Salem Press, 1911.

Wood, Cynthia A. “The Halo of Tradition: Social and Military Duty in the Frontier Army in Arizona, 1870-1890.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1998.

Women as Community Builders and Social Reformers:

Arizona Federation of Business and Professional Women. Women Who Made a Difference, 3 vols. Tucson: Arizona Business and Professional Women’s Foundation, 1994. Biographical information about female members of this organization and activities of specific clubs.

Crudup, Keith Jerome. “African-Americans in Arizona: A Twentieth-Century History,” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1998.

Dankowsky, Becky. “Women in Phoenix, 1870-1940: Daily Life and Intercultural Relations.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1997.

De La Trinidad, Maritza. “Collective Outrage: Mexican American Activism and the Quest for Educational Equality and Reform, 1950-1990.” PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, 2008.

Esquer, Cecilia Denogean. The Lie About My Inferiority: Evolution of a Chicana Activist. Mesa, AZ: Hispanic Institute of Social Issues, 2010.

Glaser, Leah S. “The Story of Guadalupe, Arizona: The Survival and Preservation of a Yaqui Community.” MA thesis, Arizona State University,1996.

Gonzales, Elizabeth Quiroz. “The Education and Public Career of Maria L. Urquides: A Case Study of a Mexican American Community Leader.” MA thesis, University of Arizona, 1986.

Hoikkala, Paivi Helena. “Native American Women and Community Work in Phoenix, 1965-1980.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1995.

Kingsolver, Barbara. Holding the Line: Women in the Great Arizona Mine Strike of 1983. New York: ILR Press, 1996.

Lykes, Aimee De Potter. “Phoenix Women in the Development of Public Policy: Territorial Beginnings.” In Phoenix in the Twentieth Century: Essays in Community History. Edited by G. Wesley Johnson, Jr. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1993.

Marin, Christine. “La Asociacion Hispano-Americana de Madres y Esposas: Tucson’s Mexican American Women in World War II.” In La Mexicana-Chicana, Renato Rosaldo Lecture Series, 1983-84. Tucson: Mexican American Studies and Research Center, University of Arizona, 1985, pp. 5-18.

--------. “Mexican Americans on the Home Front: Community Organizations in Arizona during World War II.” Microform, ERIC Clearing House, 1987.

Melcher, Mary. “Blacks and Whites Together: Interracial Leadership in the Phoenix Civil Rights Movement.” Journal of Arizona History 32 (1991): 195-216.

-----. “’This is not Right”: Rural Arizona Women Challenge Segregation and Ethnic Division, 1925-1950.” Frontiers (1999):195-216.

Moore, Darby Jane. “The United States Birth Control Movement and Arizona Women: Biography, Social Action, and Community.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1999.

McCroskey, Mona Lange. “Grace Marion Sparkes: Matriarch of the Early Arizona Tourist Industry.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1987.

Reynolds, Jean A. “’We Made Our Life as Best We Could with What We Had’: Mexican American Women in Phoenix, 1930-1949.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1998.

Ross, Marjorie Wheeler. History of the Arizona Federation of Woman’s Clubs and its Forerunners. Phoenix: Arizona Federation of Woman’s Clubs, 1944.

Stone, Laura Lynn. “Captive, Cohabitant, Community Builder: Arizona Women, 1865-1935.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1991.

Titcomb, Mary Ruth. “Americanization and Mexicans in the Southwest: A History of Phoenix’s Friendly House, 1920-1983.” PhD dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1984.

Whitaker, Matthew C. “In Search of Black Phoenicians: African American Culture and Community in Phoenix, Arizona, 1868-1940.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1997.

--------. Race Work: The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2005. Biography of civil rights activist Eleanor Ragsdale.

Women and Criminal Justice/Prostitution/Violence:

Bommersbach, Jana. The Trunk Murderess Winnie Ruth Judd: The Truth About an American Crime Legend Revealed at Last. New York: Simon & Schuster, 1992.

Carmony, Neil B., ed. Whiskey, Six-Guns & Red-Light Ladies: George Hand’s Saloon Diary, Tucson, 1875-1878. Silver City: High-Lonesome Books, 1994.

Dobkins, J. Dwight. Winnie Ruth Judd: The Trunk Murders. New York: Grosset & Dunlap, 1973.

Earp, Josephine Sarah Marcus. I Married Wyatt Earp: The Recollections of Josephine Sarah Marcus Earp. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1976.

Elliot, J. F. “The Great Western: Sarah Bowman, Mother and Mistress to the U.S. Army.” Journal of Arizona History 30 (1989): 1-26.

Hietter, Paul T. “To Encourage the Preservation and Sanctity of the Marriage Relation: Victorian Attitudes in Arizona Territory and the Murder Prosecution of Frank C. Kibbey.” Journal of Arizona History 42 (2001): 249-276.

Klungness, Elizabeth J. Prisoners in Petticoats: The Yuma Territorial Prison and its Women. Yuma: Yuma County Historical Society Publications, 1993.

Knepper, Paul. "The Women of Yuma: Gender, Ethnicity, and Imprisonment in Frontier Arizona, 1876-1909.” Criminal Justice Review (1992): 235-257.

McGinty, Brian. The Oatman Massacre: A Tale of Desert Captivity and Survival. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 2005.

Mifflin, Margot. The Blue Tattoo: The Life of Olive Oatman. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2009.

Moynahan, J. M. Sarah Bowman, Pioneer Madam: A True and Accurate Narrative of a Sportin’ Woman also Known as “The Great Northern.” Spokane: Chickadee Publications, 2004.

Roberts, Virginia Culin. “’The Women Was Too Tough.’” Journal of Arizona History 26 (1985): 395-414. Female criminals.

--------. “Mary Page Handy and the Lawyer Who Dared Defend Her.” Journal of Arizona History 30 (1989): 365-390. A domestic violence case.

Santiago, Mark. “The Flight of Some Weak Women. Apache Prisoners of War in New Spain: A 1799 Incident.” Journal of Arizona History 51 (2010): 51-68.

Smith, Victoria. Captive Arizona, 1851-1900. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2009.

Stone, Laura Lynn. “Captive, Cohabitant, Community Builder: Arizona Women, 1865-1935.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1991.

Stratton, Royal B. Captivity of the Oatman Girls. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 1983.

Sturgeon, Melanie. “’Belgian Jennie’ Bauters: Mining-Town Madam.” Journal of Arizona History 48 (2007): 349-374.

Native American Women:

Aleshire, Peter. Warrior Woman: The Story of Lozen, Apache Warrior and Shaman. New York: St. Martin’s Press, 2001.

Buchanan, Kimberly Moore. Apache Women Warriors. El Paso: Texas Western Press, 1986.

Davis, Carolyn O’Bagy. Hopi Summers: Letters from Ethel to Maud. Tucson: Rio Nuevo Publishers, 2007.

Deyhle, Donna. Reflections in Place: Connected Lives of Navajo Women. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2009.

Glaser, Leah S. “The Story of Guadalupe, Arizona: The Survival and Preservation of a Yaqui Community.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1996.

Hoikkala, Paivi Helena. “Native American Women and Community Work in Phoenix, 1965-1980.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1995.

Kramer, Barbara. Nampeyo and Her Pottery. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2003.

Manuel, Frances and Deborah Neff. Desert Indian Woman: Stories and Dreams. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2001.

McCloskey, Joanne. Living through the Generations: Continuity and Change in Navajo Women’s Lives. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2007.

Melanson, Yvette, with Claire Safran. Looking for Lost Bird: A Jewish Woman Discovers her Navajo Roots. Austin: Bard Press, 1999.

Nez Denetdale, Jennifer. Reclaiming Diné" History: The Legacies of Navajo Chief Manuelito and Juanita. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2007.

Niethammer, Carolyn. I’ll Go and Do More: Annie Dodge Wauneka, Navajo Leader and Activist. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2001

Qoyawayma, Polingaysi. No Turning Back: A True Account of a Hopi Girl’s Struggle to Bridge the Gap Between the World of Her People and the World of the White Man. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1971.

Roth, Barbara J. Engendering Households in the Prehistoric Southwest. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2010.

Santiago, Mark. “The Flight of Some Weak Women. Apache Prisoners of War in New Spain: A 1799 Incident.” Journal of Arizona History 51 (2010): 51-68.

Shaw, Anna Moore. A Pima Past. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1974.

Trennert, Robert A. “Sage Memorial Hospital and the Nation’s First All-Indian School of Nursing.” Journal of Arizona History 44 (2003): 353-374.

-----.“Superwomen in Indian Country: U.S.I.S. Field Nurses in Arizona and New Mexico, 1928-1940.” Journal of Arizona History 41 (2000): 31-56.

Udall, Louise. Me and Mine: The Life Story of Helen Sekaquaptewa. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1969.

Watt, Eva Tulene. Don’t Let the Sun Step Over You: A White Mountain Apache Family Life (1860-1975). Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004.

Mexican American Women:

Benton-Cohen, Katherine. Borderline Americans: Racial Division and Labor War in the Arizona Borderlands. Cambridge, Mass: Harvard University Press, 2009.

-------. “Border Jews, Border Marriages, Border Lives: Mexican-Jewish Intermarriage on the Arizona Border, 1850-1900.” University of Wisconsin, 1997.

-------. “Common Purpose, Worlds Apart: Mexican-American, Mormon, and Midwestern Women Homesteaders in Cochise County, Arizona.” Western Historical Quarterly (2005): 429-451.

-------. “What about Women in the White Man’s Camp? Gender, Nation, and the Redefinition of Race in Cochise County, Arizona, 1853-1941.” PhD dissertation, University of Wisconsin-Madison, 2002.

Campbell, Julie A. “Madres y Esposas: Tucson’s Spanish-American Mothers and Wives Association.” Journal of Arizona History 31 (1990): 161-182.

De La Trinidad, Maritza. “Collective Outrage: Mexican American Activism and the Quest for Educational Equality and Reform, 1950-1990.” PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, 2008.

Ford, Elyssa Bender. “The Hidden Cowgirls: Uncovering Minority Women in American Rodeo.” MA Thesis, Arizona State University, 2006.

Goldsmith, Raquel Rubio. “Shipwrecked in the Desert: A Short History of the Mexican Sisters of the House of the Providence in Douglas, Arizona, 1927-1949.” In╩Women on the U.S.-Mexico Border. Edited by Vicky L. Ruiz and Susan Tiano. Boston: Allen & Unwin, 1987, pp. 177-195.

Gonzales, Elizabeth Quiroz. “The Education and Public Career of Maria L. Urquides: A Case Study of a Mexican American Community Leader.” MA thesis, University of Arizona, 1986.

Gordon, Linda. The Great Arizona Orphan Abduction. Cambridge: Harvard University Press, 1999.

Johnson, Susan L. “Sharing Bed and Board: Cohabitation and Cultural Difference in Central Arizona Mining Towns.” Frontiers 7 (1984): 36-42.

-------. Women in Central Arizona Mining and Supply Settlements, 1863-1873. Tucson: Southwest Institute for Research on Women, 1982

Kay, Margarita Artschwager. “Health and Illness in the Barrio: Women’s Point of View.” PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, 1972.

Knepper, Paul. "The Women of Yuma: Gender, Ethnicity, and Imprisonment in Frontier Arizona, 1876-1909.” Criminal Justice Review (1992): 235-257.

Marin, Christine. “La Asociacion Hispano-Americana de Madres y Esposas: Tucson’s Mexican American Women in World War II.” In La Mexicana-Chicana, Renato Rosaldo Lecture Series, 1983-84. Tucson: Mexican American Studies and Research Center, University of Arizona, 1985, pp. 5-18.

Martin, Patricia Preciado. Songs My Mother Sang to Me: An Oral History of Mexican American Women. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1992.

-------- and José Galvez, eds. An Oral History of Mexican Americans in Southern Arizona. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2004.

Mattingly, Doreen J. and Ellen R. Hansen, eds. Women and Change at the U.S.-Mexico Border: Mobility, Labor, and Activism. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2006.

Muñoz, Laura K. “Desert Dreams: Mexican American Education in Arizona, 1870-1930”. PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 2006.

O’Neill, Colleen. “Domesticity Deployed: Gender, Race, and the Construction of Class Struggle in the Bisbee Deportation.” Labor History (1993): 256-273.

Pérez, Emma A. Oral Narratives as Chicana (His)tory Text. Tucson: Women’s Studies, The University of Arizona, 1994.

Reynolds, Jean A. “’We Made Our Life as Best We Could with What We Had’: Mexican American Women in Phoenix, 1930-1949.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1998.

Schwarz, Maureen Trudelle. Blood and Voice: Navajo Women Ceremonial Practitioners. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2003.

Titcomb, Mary Ruth. “Americanization and Mexicans in the Southwest: A History of Phoenix’s Friendly House, 1920-1983.” PhD. Dissertation, University of California, Santa Barbara, 1984.

Trennert, Robert A. The Phoenix Indian School: Forced Assimilation in Arizona, 1891-1935. Norman: University of Oklahoma Press, 1988.

Asian American Women:

Carroll, Kara Allison. “Coming to Grips with America: The Japanese American Experience in the Southwest,” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 2009.

Matsumoto, Valerie J. Shikata ga nai: Japanese American Women in Central Arizona, 1910-1978. Honors thesis, Arizona State University, 1978.

McMillan, Ellis A. “Japanese Americans in Arizona: A Study of Identity Crisis.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1997.

Melcher, Mary. “Judge Thomas Tang and Dr. Pearl Tang: Path Breakers in Law and Medicine.” Journal of the West 44 (2005): 70-77.

African American Women:

Bramlet, Sharon. Profile and Status of African American Women in Arizona: A Background Report to the 1994 Arizona Black Town Hall. Tempe: College of Public Programs, Arizona State University, 1994.

Carson, Karen Vanae. “Black Phoenician Women as Educators during the Era of Jim Crow, 1896-1954.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 2000.

Crudup, Keith Jerome. “African-Americans in Arizona: A Twentieth-Century History.” PhD dissertation, Arizona State University, 1998.

Haggerson, Nelson L. Oh Yes I Can! A Biography of Arlena E. Seneca. Tempe, AZ: Nornel Associates, 1994.

Hardaway, Roger D. “Unlawful Love: A History of Arizona’s Miscegenation Law.” Journal of Arizona History (1986): 377-390.

LeSeur, Geta. Not all Okies are White: The Lives of Black Cotton Pickers in Arizona. Columbia: University of Missouri Press, 2000.

Melcher, Mary. “Blacks and Whites Together: Interracial Leadership in the Phoenix Civil Rights Movement.” Journal of Arizona History 32 (1991): 195-216.

--------. “’This is not Right”: Rural Arizona Women Challenge Segregation and Ethnic Division, 1925-1950.” Frontiers (1999):195-216.

Thul, Jackie Lynn Byrd. "African American School Segregation in Arizona from 1863-1954.” MA thesis, Arizona State University,1993..

Whitaker, Matthew C. “In Search of Black Phoenicians: African American Culture and Community in Phoenix, Arizona, 1868-1940.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1997.

--------. Race Work: The Rise of Civil Rights in the Urban West. Lincoln: University of Nebraska Press, 2005. Biography of civil rights activist Eleanor Ragsdale.

Women in Historic Preservation and Philanthropy:

Gipson, Rosemary. “’Hassayamper’s Evening’: The Birth of the Sharlot Hall Museum.” Journal of Arizona History 19 (1978): 417-428.

Maxwell, Margaret F. A Passion for Freedom: The Life of Sharlot Hall. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1982.

Mangum, Richard K. and Sherry G. Mangum. One Woman’s West: The Life of Mary-Russell Ferrell Colton. Flagstaff: Northland Publishing, 1997.

Parezao, Nancy J., ed. Hidden Scholars: Women Anthropologists and the Native American Southwest. Albuquerque: University of New Mexico Press, 1993.

Pritchard, Melissa. Devotedly Virginia: The Life of Virginia Galvin Piper. Phoenix: Virginia G. Piper Charitable Trust, 2008. Biography of a philanthropist.

Women and Travel, Adventure, and Sports:

Berger, Todd R. Reflections of Grand Canyon Historians: Ideas, Arguments, and First-Person Accounts. Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon Association, 2007.

Cook, William. The Wen, the Botany, and the Mexican Hat: The Adventures of the First Women through Grand Canyon on the Nevillis Expedition. Orangevale, CA: Callisto Books, 1987.

-------.” Mrs. Fiske Tours Arizona.” Journal of Arizona History 22 (1981): 277-294. Well-known actress Minnie Fiske tours the state.

Ford, Elyssa Bender. “The Hidden Cowgirls: Uncovering Minority Women in American Rodeo.” MA Thesis, Arizona State University, 2006.

Frey, Katie Manciet. From Wildkittens to Wildcats: Women’s Sports at the University of Arizona. Portland, OR: Inkwater Press, 2010.

Godfrey, Audrey M., ed. “Writing in the ďWaggon’: The 1895 Travel Journal of Lucretia Pepper Wightman.” Journal of Arizona History 51 (2010): 95-154.

Hall, Sharlot M. Sharlot Hall on the Arizona Strip: A Diary of a Journey through Northern Arizona in 1911. Edited by C. Gregory Crampton. Flagstaff: Northland Press, 1975.

Hollenback, Amelia. Immortal Summer: A Victorian Woman's Travels in the Southwest: The 1897 Letters & Photographs of Amelia Hollenback. Edited and annotated by Mary J. Straw Cook. Santa Fe: Museum of New Mexico Press, 2002.

Jorgenson, Avis E., ed. “Summer of Innocence: The Desert Rovers All-Girl Orchestra Barnstorms Arizona, 1930: The Recollections of Ardis Larsen Clark.” Journal of Arizona History 44 (2003): 265-310.

Leavengood, Betty. Grand Canyon Women: Lives Shaped by Landscape. Grand Canyon: Grand Canyon Association, 2004.

Poling-Kempes, Lesley. The Harvey Girls: Women Who Opened the West. New York: Marlowe & Co., 1991.

Pyle, Jinx & Jayne Peace. Rodeo 101: History of the Payson, Arizona Rodeo, 1884-1984. Payson: Git A Rope! Publishing, 2004. Chapter on women in the rodeo.

Purcell, Laura A. “The Queens and the Ramblers: Women’s Championship Softball in Phoenix, 1932-1965.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 2004.

Riffe, Terri Dean. “A History of Women’s Sports at the University of Arizona.” PhD dissertation, University of Arizona, 1986.

Roberts, Virginia Culin. “Horseback to Mount Baldy: A Ranchwoman’s Holiday, 1913.” Journal of Arizona History 21 (1980): 25-42. A woman from Bisbee goes on vacation in the White Mountains.

Scharff, Virginia. “The Lady Takes the Wheel: Arizona Women on the Road.” Journal of Arizona History 34 (1993): 419-432.

Smalley, Flora. “’We Slept in the Wagon’: An Arizona Camping Trip, 1902.” Journal of Arizona History 12 (1971): 183-212.

Teal, Louise. Breaking into the Current: Boatwomen of the Grand Canyon. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 1994.

Women and Military Life:

Holmes, Alice D. “’And I Was Always with Him’: The Life of Jane Thorpy, Army Laundress.” Journal of Arizona History 38 (1997): 177-190.

Melton, Brad and Dean Smith, eds. Arizona Goes to War: The Home Front and the Front Lines during World War II. Tucson: University of Arizona Press, 2003. Chapter on women in the military.

Schreier, Jim ed. “’For This I Had Left Civilization’: Julia Davis at Camp McDowell, 1869-1870.” Journal of Arizona History 29 (1988): 185-198.

Smith, Bill W. “Martha Dunham Summerhayes: Correcting the Biographical Record.” Journal of Arizona History 37 (1996): 67-72.

Summerhayes, Martha. Vanished Arizona: Recollections of the Army Life of a New England Woman. Salem, Mass.: Salem Press, 1911.

Wood, Cynthia A. “The Halo of Tradition: Social and Military Duty in the Frontier Army in Arizona, 1870-1890.” MA thesis, Arizona State University, 1998.
 

Primary Source Material Available in Archives

 

Most major research libraries and archives have online databases to help a researcher find letters, census material, newspapers, photographs, and other primary source documents. Below are some links to the major repositories where you might want to start your research. Be aware that this is just a beginning. Most libraries and archives have only partially indexed their materials, so you will want to follow up with a call or a visit for complete access to documents. Please be sure to call ahead for research hours.

Arizona State Library, Archives and Public Records (ASLAPR) has the largest collection of material related to Arizona history and the most complete collection of Arizona newspapers.

Polly Rosenbaum Archives and History Building
1901 West Madison • Phoenix, AZ 85009
Phone: 602-926-3720

ASLAPR website: http://www.lib.az.us/Default.aspx

The Arizona Memory Project, produced by ASLAPR, allows online access to over 67,000 digital items related to Arizona history, from a variety of archival repositories. This site also lists the biographies of numerous Latinas published in Latina Perspectives magazine. http://azmemory.lib.az.us/

The Arizona Historical Society has repositories in Tucson, Tempe, Yuma, and Flagstaff. Much of its material can be searched on LISTA, its online database. The Arizona Historical Society, Tucson, holds the complete collection of articles presented at the annual Arizona Historical Convention. http://lista.azhist.arizona.edu/

The Arizona Historical Foundation is located in Hayden Library on the Arizona State University campus. Many of its collections are processed and can be accessed online with the following finding aid. http://www.ahfweb.org/collections_processed.html

The state three universities each have separate archival collections, but have created a cooperative index, Arizona Archives Online, that allows you to search the various collections simultaneously. http://aao.lib.asu.edu/index.html

The Department of Archives and Special Collections, Hayden Library at Arizona State University has created the on-line Special Materials Index that reflects primary sources about the people, places, events, photographs and history of Arizona’s Mexican Americans, Native Americans, and those of southwestern states. http://www.asu.edu/lib/archives/arizona

The Sharlot Hall Museum’s archives, located in Prescott, can be searched at http://www.sharlot.org/archives/index.html

Compiled by Heidi Osselaer and the AWHT Scholars’ Board, 2010
 

 

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